Between Us by @WendiZwaduk ~ #menageromance #menage #mfmromance #contemporary #erotic #3some #excerpt

Between Us by Wendi Zwaduk betweenus_800

in the Boots and Chaps and Cowboy Hats Anthology


M/F, M/F/M, Menage, Anal Sex

Short Story

Sometimes coming home is the best way to heal a broken heart—especially with two ranch hands involved.

Channon Kennedy planned to come home, but she never expected to find herself in the arms of the two men she’s fantasized over since high school. Back then, Shaun and Brian didn’t seem interested. Now, she’s older, wiser and has nothing to lose. If the men of her dreams want her, who is she to resist?

Shaun Maple and Brian Powell have done everything together—work at the farm, live together and love the same woman. They’ve wanted Channon since they first laid eyes on her, but circumstances beyond their control kept the threesome apart. Times have changed and so have Shaun and Brian. They’re not taking no for an answer—they want her between them for good. Can the ranch hands convince her she’s the only woman for them or will the relationship implode before it gets a chance to grow?

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Now for An Excerpt!!

©Wendi Zwaduk, 2016, All Rights Reserved

“Where are a couple of farm boys when I need them?” Channon Kennedy brushed her horse, Peaches, and rested her head on the side of the large animal’s neck. She liked being around the horses. She could talk to them and not have to worry about someone arguing with her. She’d done enough arguing in the last year for a lifetime.

“I don’t know how I’m going to manage,” she said. She stopped brushing the horse and looked Peaches in the eye. “I’m one person with three horses and a hundred acres. That’s a lot for one person to keep things going.”

The horse snorted, then shook her head.

“I get it. We’ll figure it out.” She sighed and surveyed the stall. According to her father’s notes, there were two farm hands living on the property. She hadn’t seen anyone, but the state of the stall said otherwise. Someone had cleaned it out recently. She’d need to shovel out the muck and add fresh straw, but it could’ve been worse.

Not knowing who lived on the farm was her own fault. She’d been at the house for three days, but had only ventured out during the last hour. Between the guilt over not being home when her father died and mourning the loss of him, she hadn’t wanted to be out in public. She grieved for the end of her relationship with her former boyfriend, Jack, too. The bastard had cheated on her and dumped her for a younger woman. She shouldn’t have been so upset. Getting rid of him should’ve been a relief, but it wasn’t. Seven years was a long time to be with someone, only to be shafted.

Channon climbed the side of the stall and sat on the wooden planks. She leaned against the divider bars between the stables. “I miss the boys the most.” She gripped the shelf along the wall. “I could use their help, yeah, but I miss their friendship. Brian and Shaun were here when no one else cared.”

Peaches shifted around and bumped her head against Channon’s side. Channon hugged the horse. “I miss them. I shouldn’t because we’re horrible when we’re together. I still remember all the times we got into trouble, but it was fun.”




Book Review ~ Not My Father’s Son by Alan Cumming ~ #review @MeganSlayer

fATHERDark, painful memories can be put away to be forgotten. Until one day they all flood back in horrible detail.

When television producers approached Alan Cumming to appear on a popular celebrity genealogy show, he hoped to solve the mystery of his maternal grandfather’s disappearance that had long cast a shadow over his family. But this was not the only mystery laid before Alan.

Alan grew up in the grip of a man who held his family hostage, someone who meted out violence with a frightening ease, who waged a silent war with himself that sometimes spilled over onto everyone around him. That man was Alex Cumming, Alan’s father, whom Alan had not seen or spoken to for more than a decade when he reconnected just before filming for Who Do You Think You Are? began. He had a secret he had to share, one that would shock his son to his very core and set into motion a journey that would change Alan’s life forever.

With ribald humor, wit, and incredible insight, Alan seamlessly moves back and forth in time, integrating stories from his childhood in Scotland and his experiences today as the celebrated actor of film, television, and stage. At times suspenseful, at times deeply moving, but always incredibly brave and honest, Not My Father’s Son is a powerful story of embracing the best aspects of the past and triumphantly pushing the darkness aside.

I’d heard about this book in my book club and wanted to read it. The moment I learned about Alan Cumming, I was intrigued.  The man is interesting, funny and writes well.

Where some may not like the back and forth style of this book – he alternates between his past and his current situation – I liked it. I didn’t see any other way to understand what he’d been through besides going back and forth between the past where he’d been abused by his father and unloved by the man, to the guy he’s become – the guy searching for himself.

I liked how his search for his past was chronicled in the book and on the show “Who Do You Think You Are?”. It made Cumming more realistic to me. I laughed at some of his stories, cried at his heartbreak and rooted for him to have the happy ending he deserved. There were moments I couldn’t help but be angry for what he’d gone through and I liked his brother.

If you want a book that’s well written, amusing, gut-wrenching and touching, then this might be the one for you. I recommend it.

Book Review ~ Amy: My Search for Her Killer: Secrets & Suspects in the Unsolved Murder of Amy Mihaljevic #bookreview


“I fell in love with Amy Mihaljevic not long before her body was discovered lying facedown in an Ashland County wheat field. I fell for her the first time I saw that school photo TV stations flashed at the beginning of every newscast in the weeks following her kidnapping in the autumn of 1989―the photo with the side-saddle ponytail . . .”

So begins this strange and compelling memoir in which a young journalist investigates the cold case that has haunted him since childhood.

It’s one of Northeast Ohio’s most frustrating unsolved crimes. Ten-year-old Amy Mihaljevic (Muh-ha-luh-vick) disappeared from the comfortable Cleveland suburb of Bay Village. Thousands of volunteers, police officers, and FBI agents searched for the girl, who was tragically found dead a few months later. Her killer was never found.

Fifteen years later, journalist James Renner picks up the leads. Filled with mysterious riddles, incredible coincidences, and a cast of odd but very real characters, his investigation quickly becomes a riveting journey in search of the truth.

Interesting and sad.

I’m reading this book for my local book club. Would I have picked it up on my own? Not sure. I remember quite clearly when this case happened. I remember my mother freaking out that I – or any of my friends – might be the next kid taken. Sadly, kids are taken all the time. I remember when she was found and how my mother cried. Now that I have a tot, I can identify with my mother’s reaction.

This book though, is like reading a diary. The author isn’t detailing the case, in so much as he’s recalling his reactions to what happened, his path to writing the initial story for the Cleveland paper and eventually the book deal.

In some instances, I got a little spooked. I know the area where she was taken and where she was found. It hit a little too close to home for me. There were moments in the book that the author talks about his life and I recall what I was doing around those times. But the thing that struck me the most about this book is the author certainly got too close to the subject. I know, how can one get close to a deceased person? Let’s just say there were more than a few times when it seemed like he was more interested in getting with the fictionalized version of the girl that he’d created in his mind, than anything else.

I get it. If you were a kid around that time, the whole thing was scary. I learned from the example. Don’t go anywhere without telling anyone and don’t go off with anyone you don’t know. Renner hits that point home often in this book. While it’s a quick read, I had to go in with the mindset that he’s writing more from his own perspective than that of an omniscient observer.  I don’t know how being possibly hit on by one of the girl’s friends had much to do with solving the murder. Honestly, that moment felt like an aside that didn’t need to be in the book. But the murder did affect his life and that of the people who knew the girl. Sadness affects everyone differently and if this was his way to cope, then so be it.

If you like crime stories and are willing to get past the personalized ares in some of the book, then this might be the read for you.

Book Review ~ A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman #bookreview #review

5151jMdx7TL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him “the bitter neighbor from hell.” But must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.

Initially, I wasn’t fond of this book. I’ll admit it. Ove got on my nerves. I am not the very factual, very direct kind of person that Ove is. I have grey areas. He doesn’t. Honestly, two-thirds of the way through the book, I still wasn’t converted. I didn’t see the point. I kept expecting something nasty to happen to ‘cat’, too.

But then about the two-thirds point, the book changed. Okay, maybe the book didn’t change, but my perception, did. I got to see the man, Ove, become more than he was. I understood him better and quite honestly, I rooted for him. I liked his interactions with the neighbors and ‘cat’. There was a sweet man under that curmudgeon facade. I won’t give away the ending, but I did cry. I felt like I’d known Ove all along.

If you want a book that might take some getting used to and some endurance to get through (you’ll be rewarded), then this might be the book for you. I’m glad I picked it up.

Book Review Thursday ~ Gwendy’s Button Box by Stephen King and Richard Chizmar #bookreview #books

BOXThe little town of Castle Rock, Maine has witnessed some strange events and unusual visitors over the years, but there is one story that has never been told… until now.

There are three ways up to Castle View from the town of Castle Rock: Route 117, Pleasant Road, and the Suicide Stairs. Every day in the summer of 1974 twelve-year-old Gwendy Peterson has taken the stairs, which are held by strong (if time-rusted) iron bolts and zig-zag up the cliffside.

At the top of the stairs, Gwendy catches her breath and listens to the shouts of the kids on the playground. From a bit farther away comes the chink of an aluminum bat hitting a baseball as the Senior League kids practice for the Labor Day charity game.

One day, a stranger calls to Gwendy: “Hey, girl. Come on over here for a bit. We ought to palaver, you and me.”

On a bench in the shade sits a man in black jeans, a black coat like for a suit, and a white shirt unbuttoned at the top. On his head is a small neat black hat. The time will come when Gwendy has nightmares about that hat…

I have to admit I’m a Stephen King junkie. I am. I’m also a bit of a short story junkie, too. When I saw this book at my local library, just sitting there unassumingly on the shelf, I had to sneak a peek. I mean, it’s a King and her name is Gwendy…close to Wendi, right?

So I picked it up. I’m glad I did. This was a quick read and even though it’s short, when I had to put it down to deal with life, I didn’t have to do a bunch of rereading to catch back up.

Gwendy is an interesting character. She has an awesome power within her and within the button box. Will she use it? Will she succumb? Will she get a big head from the power? I liked that Gwendy is relatable. There are things that made her more than she was, but I liked her human-ness. Now I would’ve been more than a little freaked out if some random guy wanted me to sit with him. Even more if he’d have offered me a box. I don’t know how Gwendy did it, but she did.

I liked how she grew through the story, too. The creep factor isn’t as strong in this story, which was nice for me because I wasn’t looking for a freaky story. But might be a turn off for others.

If you want a recent historical story with more than few twists, then this might be the short story you’re looking for. Oh and try a chocolate. I hear the detailing is fantastic.

Book Review ~ Doctor Sleep by Stephen King


On highways across America, a tribe of people called the True Knot travel in search of sustenance. They look harmless—mostly old, lots of polyester, and married to their RVs. But as Dan Torrance knows, and spunky twelve-year-old Abra Stone learns, the True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the steam that children with the shining produce when they are slowly tortured to death.

Haunted by the inhabitants of the Overlook Hotel, where he spent one horrific childhood year, Dan has been drifting for decades, desperate to shed his father’s legacy of despair, alcoholism, and violence. Finally, he settles in a New Hampshire town, an AA community that sustains him, and a job at a nursing home where his remnant shining power provides the crucial final comfort to the dying. Aided by a prescient cat, he becomes “Doctor Sleep.”

Then Dan meets the evanescent Abra Stone, and it is her spectacular gift, the brightest shining ever seen, that reignites Dan’s own demons and summons him to a battle for Abra’s soul and survival. This is an epic war between good and evil, glorious story that will thrill the millions of devoted readers of The Shining and satisfy anyone new to this icon in the Stephen King canon.

I’ve devoured all of Stephen King’s books, save for the Dark Tower series. I knew this one would be a follow-up to The Shining. I’d loved that book and yeah, it creeped me out. I hoped this one would do the same thing.

The spook factor was there, but not the traditional jump out at you kind of one. This creep factor was in the scariness of real things. Like the caravans of RVs going down the road. If you let your imagination go and look at them as the True Knot, then that’s kind of creepy. I can’t listen to “Not a Second Time” by the Beatles without thinking of the little girl singing the song in the middle of the night.

The writing was great, as per his books, and I raced right through it. I wanted to know what would happen next for Abra and Dan.

I know this book won’t be for everyone. Those wanting the big screams may not get what they want. Those expecting old King, might not be thrilled, but I was. I enjoyed the story and how the tale ended. Try it. You might like it, too.




Wednesday Book Review ~ Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley

LILYTed—a gay, single, struggling writer is stuck: unable to open himself up to intimacy except through the steadfast companionship of Lily, his elderly dachshund. When Lily’s health is compromised, Ted vows to save her by any means necessary. By turns hilarious and poignant, an adventure with spins into magic realism and beautifully evoked truths of loss and longing, Lily and the Octopus reminds us how it feels to love fiercely, how difficult it can be to let go, and how the fight for those we love is the greatest fight of all.

I have to be honest. I’m supposed to read this book for my book club. I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it. The premise snagged me. I won’t lie. A guy and his dog. Yep. I’m a dog person. Okay, I’m a critter person. I’m the one who swears at the movie when the people live but the dog/cat/ferret/etc dies. I knew what would happen. Spoiler alert…yeah, there’s a very tissue-worthy moment at the end. Like super tissue-worthy.

But to tell you how I feel about the book…it’s complicated. I liked it. Okay, I liked parts of it. The connection between Ted and Lily was a riot. How she talked… In! All! Exclamation! Points! is very much how Dachshunds bark, so effectively how they talk. I loved that part. How she was his support was good, too. If you’ve ever had a connection with a dog, you know they aren’t just pets. They’re family. So I got and loved that part.

But there were points I kinda wasn’t impressed. The whole portion with the octopus was a little hard to handle. Once I understood, then I understood, but it took a bit. Then there was his tendency to drown his sorrows in pills and booze. Hey. We’ve all been there. Done things we wouldn’t normally do. That made Ted real, but I guess I expected something different. Maybe more….arguing. More fighting. Maybe I lost it in the metaphor of the octopus.

Either way, the book was good, but I’m not sure I can read it again. The bit at the end where I mentioned the tissues was a tad too real for me. Having put an animal down not long ago, this made those memories rawer. So if that’s a trigger for you, then read the book, but be warned. If you’re looking for a sweet, sappy ending, you might be surprised.

I’d buy this one and keep it, but I’m not sure I can handle reading it again right now. See what you think. You might be pleasantly surprised…after tissues.