Book Review ~ Remembering the Stars of the NFL Glory Years: An Inside Look at the Golden Age of Football by Wayne Stewart #Bookreview @meganSlayer

NFLThe 1950s and 60s was a golden age for professional football. It was perhaps the toughest and roughest era for the sport, before rules were created to better protect the players, but it was also a time when legends were born. To many football fans this era remains the Glory Years of the NFL, when the stars that roamed the gridiron included the likes of Johnny Unitas, Bart Starr, Jim Brown, and Raymond Berry.

In Remembering the Stars of the NFL Glory Years: An Inside Look at the Golden Age of Football, Wayne Stewart tells the story of professional football in the ‘50s and ‘60s through the words of the players themselves. Chapters cover Hall of Famers on both sides of the ball, players who made a lasting impression on the game, and the toughest players on the gridiron. Stewart intertwines profiles of these iconic players with the athletes’ own memories, observations, and anecdotes, including their impressions of teammates and opponents. Two additional chapters consist of humorous quotes and the players’ thoughts on how the game has changed since their heyday.

Featuring exclusive interviews with players from the 1950s and ‘60s, Remembering the Stars of the NFL Glory Years provides an inside look at this distinct time in professional football. With a wide range of topics and insights included throughout, this book will both entertain and inform football fans and historians alike.

I love football and I love to learn about the game. This book taught me all about a few players I knew and whole lot I didn’t.  There are plenty of names that pop right out and most that, being a younger fan, weren’t recognizable to me. That’s okay. The way the stories are told in this book, I felt like I was sitting around a table and jawing about the good old days.

It’s a fun read and there are a lot of stats, but it’s not a boring telling. The one thing that did trip me up a few times were the transitions between stories. Sometimes the transitions were smooth. I saw how one player had something to do with the next. Other times, it was a simple break and kind of hard to follow.

Still, a good and interesting read.

If you’re looking for a book about the players from the 50s and 60s and few even before that, then this might be the book for you.

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